Steampunk Denim Jacket

It’s a jacket made of denim…and that’s all the relationship this has to a traditional “jean jacket.” This has been on my to-do list for…maybe a year? And finally I did it!

For the pattern, I used Simplicity 8020, View A. Major changes from that pattern were to replace the buttons with a zipper and add a set of darts in the front since it was looking a bit boxy when I first tried it on. I made a lot of fitting adjustments to accommodate my narrow shoulders, but that isn’t a reflection of the pattern so much as it is how my body relates to the “standard” sizing. (With each project, I learn more about how to adjust the fitting and I’m pretty happy with my progress on this one.)

IMG_5811

I love that the jacket looks tailored, yet is actually quite loose in the torso (which means it’s comfortable and will hopefully fit over bulkier tops).

IMG_5846

The one thing I think I’d do differently if I made this again is to make the sleeves tapered or straight to the wrist. The ruffle is cute, but it leaves the forearms rather exposed–not so great if you’re wearing this for warmth. (Though this does mean I now have an excuse to get some of those scissors arm warmers from Sock Dreams….)

The jacked is unlined and all inside seams are finished with my serger, then pressed to one side and topstitched.

IMG_5872

But of course the really exciting touch is the patches on the back.

IMG_5871

Loki wants to know what the fuss is all about.

These are sold by MTthreadz on Etsy, and they have soooo many great patches! You can see from the photo above this one that I sewed these on–I did iron them on, but it didn’t seem like they would stay (especially since they’re so large and on an area that would see a lot of movement) so I stitched around the edges with my machine. I will definitely be picking up more patches for future projects.

On a related note, I’ve dived into fall/winter sewing. The main things I “need” for the next few months are:

  • Turtlenecks
  • Toiletries bag
  • Ballgown for November
  • Ren fair outfit

Other things I’m hoping to make:

  • Wool skirt
  • Long-sleeved knit dress
  • Clutch purse (I’m dying to make this one, but the instructions are awfully daunting)

Ah, so many plans!

Regency Spencer

Last month, a few of us costuming enthusiasts had a nineteenth-century picnic in Central Park. We were mostly Regency, which gave me an excuse to make new stays (already blogged) and a spencer.

Picnic1(Leia, me, Marci, and Alex. Photo by James)

The spencer is the Sense and Sensibility Regency Spencer/Pelisse pattern. I made the lapels a bit less pointy and adjusted the shoulder width (successfully! finally!), but otherwise didn’t make any major changes. I think the sleeves ended up a bit short, so the next time I have an excuse to work on Regency outfits I may add cuffs. I interlined the lapels and collar with hair canvas for stiffness, though the pattern just calls for interfacing the collar.

haircanvasThe entire bodice is self-lined and the sleeves are unlined (I finished the armscyes with self-binding). The jacket closes with two hooks and eyes; the fabric-covered buttons are just decorative.

spencerfront spencerhooksandeyesBut my favorite decoration is the cotton piping!

spencerbackspencerpiping

Fabric is a mediumweight linen, which was perfect for a spring day–breathable but provided a bit of warmth.

17019435670_f332ff9416_z

(Photo by Marci)

In other costuming news, it’s looking like there’ll be a good chance I can join my sister at the big Texas Renaissance Festival in November. Three days of Ren fair equals three different costumes, right?? At this point, I’m thinking:

  1. Italian Renaissance gown (already made)
  2. Classic Ren fair “wench” outfit (which I’ll have to make entirely, but damn it I’ve been wanting one since high school!)
  3. “Goth” Ren fair outfit (aka, an excuse to finally finish altering my black leather Timeless Trends corset)

YES, only the first costume is even remotely historically accurate. But that’s the fun of Renaissance fairs: they’re a great excuse for fantasy dress up! It’s kind of refreshing to wear whatever outfit you want regardless of whether it’s “correct.” (I think the researching part of historical costuming is fun–don’t get me wrong–but sometimes it’s a nice break to just indulge yourself in complete fantasy.)

(Top photo in this post is by Leia)